A couple of years ago, I had a terrible bout with joint pain and decided to try vitamin D to see if it might help. While it did not completely get rid of my symptoms, it did greatly reduce them. This nutrient is known to be a powerful anti-inflammatory and works to keep the body’s…

A couple of years ago, I had a terrible bout with joint pain and decided to try vitamin D to see if it might help. While it did not completely get rid of my symptoms, it did greatly reduce them.
This nutrient is known to be a powerful anti-inflammatory and works to keep the body’s bones strong. Getting enough of this vitamin can prevent bone loss and osteoporosis, which can lead to hip and knee arthritis.
The recommended daily dose for most people is 400IU, but some need more than this based on age and other factors. Talk to your healthcare provider about how much you need and whether you should take a supplement or not.
In addition to helping maintain healthy bones, vitamin D also helps protect against the development of rheumatoid arthritis. This autoimmune disease is characterized by swollen joints and a sensitivity to pain and temperature changes in the affected areas of the body.
Some studies suggest that a lack of vitamin D can worsen RA symptoms and make the condition more difficult to manage. This is because it can affect how the body absorbs calcium and phosphorus, which are essential for promoting bone health.
The doctor may order a blood test to check your vitamin D levels and consider adding the supplement to your treatment plan.
Symptoms of a deficiency of this vitamin include muscle weakness, fatigue, irritability, headache, depression and memory problems. A lack of vitamin D can be due to insufficient sun exposure, a diet low in certain foods, or a disease that interferes with the body’s ability to absorb vitamin D.
A few things that can boost your vitamin D intake are sunlight, fatty fish, and dairy products. It is also important to consume vitamin C, which helps the body produce vitamin D from dietary sources.
You can easily increase your vitamin D level by increasing your daily intake of foods that are rich in this nutrient or taking a daily supplement. This is especially true for women who are pregnant or nursing.
Research has shown that a lack of vitamin D is common in people with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia. This nutrient is particularly helpful for these patients because it decreases the pain of their disease, increases their energy and improves their quality of life.
In fact, one study found that a high dose of vitamin D (50,000 IU) over 20 weeks decreased the pain in participants suffering from fibromyalgia.
Using high doses of vitamin D for a long time can have negative side effects. So, it is best to start slow and work your way up.
Vitamin D can be toxic in large doses, so be sure to consult with your doctor before starting to take a supplement or vitamin D. They will be able to recommend the right dosage for you and ensure that it is safe to take.

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