Your bones provide your body with shape, produce red blood cells, store minerals, protect vital organs and enable movement. They are continually breaking down and regenerating to keep your body functioning well. Strong bones can help reduce your risk of bone loss, fractures and osteoporosis in your older years. This is why it’s so important…

Your bones provide your body with shape, produce red blood cells, store minerals, protect vital organs and enable movement. They are continually breaking down and regenerating to keep your body functioning well.

Strong bones can help reduce your risk of bone loss, fractures and osteoporosis in your older years. This is why it’s so important to eat a variety of foods that are good for bones and to make sure you’re getting the right amount of key nutrients every day.

Calcium and vitamin D are two of the most essential vitamins for bone health. You can get calcium through diet, but you need vitamin D to absorb it. The best ways to get adequate amounts of both are through natural sunlight and a balanced diet.

If you aren’t exposed to sun for long periods of time, or if you don’t eat a lot of fatty fish or fortified dairy products, you should consider taking a vitamin D supplement. Healthy adults who don’t have osteoporosis or a vitamin D deficiency should aim for 800 to 1,000 international units, or IUs, of vitamin D a day.

Magnesium is another crucial nutrient for bone health, as it helps your body regulate calcium levels. It is also important for muscle contraction and blood clotting. It is found naturally in many foods, such as whole grains, dark green vegetables, and nuts. However, it is important to consume plenty of magnesium-rich foods throughout the day.

Boron is a trace mineral that plays an important role in the growth and maintenance of bone tissue. Studies have shown that 1-3 mg of boron per day can support bone health.

Other nutrients that are essential for bone health include vitamin C, vitamin E, and vitamin K. These all act as antioxidants, preventing free radical damage to bones and protecting them from inflammation.

Phytochemicals in fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts and seeds may also have a protective effect on bones. This may be due to the presence of flavonoids, which are plant compounds that are thought to influence bone cell signaling and prevent oxidation.

Vitamin A is an important nutrient that supports the formation of new bone and acts as a powerful antioxidant in the body. It is found in dark-green leafy vegetables, eggs, poultry, dairy and fortified cereals. You should avoid consuming high quantities of retinol (the main form of vitamin A), which can increase your risk for fractures and bone loss.

If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should consult with your healthcare provider before adding a vitamin A supplement to your diet. You should also consult with your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that might inhibit the absorption of vitamin A, such as those used for psoriasis or other autoimmune diseases.

Protein is another nutrient that is important for your bone health. Protein helps to build and repair new bone tissue. It also helps to maintain a steady supply of blood to the bones.

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